martedì 27 settembre 2022

ONU
Cardinal Pietro Parolin Speaks at Meeting to Commemorate the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

(holyseemission.org)
On 26 September 2022, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State of the Holy See, addressed the UN High-level Meeting to Commemorate the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons.
In his remarks, Cardinal Parolin highlighted that with the war in Ukraine and unprecedented levels of conflict, the world has come close to the abyss of nuclear war. Nuclear weapons, he said, are costly, dangerous, and undermine international security. Expressing concern about the modernization and expansion of nuclear arsenals, Cardinal Parolin warned that States are increasing their reliance on nuclear deterrence, rather than meeting disarmament obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.  
While addressing the lack of consensus at the Tenth Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), Cardinal Parolin also stressed that the Vienna Declaration and Action Plan adopted at the First Meeting of States Parties of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) demonstrate that progress on nuclear disarmament can be made. He concluded by asserting that achieving the total elimination of nuclear weapons requires a response that is collective and concerted, based on mutual trust, and considers the catastrophic humanitarian and environmental consequences of nuclear use.
The text of the statement follows.

 
    Statement by His Eminence Cardinal Pietro Parolin,
Secretary of State and Head of the Delegation of the Holy See
at the UN High-level Meeting to Commemorate the International Day
for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

New York, 26 September 2022

Mr. President,
In February, the war in Ukraine brought armed conflict back to Europe on a scale not seen for generations. The repugnant threat of the use of nuclear weapons that accompanied the conflict illustrates just how close the world has come to the abyss of nuclear war. This looming threat, with devastating implications for all humanity, demonstrates that “nuclear weapons are a costly and dangerous liability,”[1] which undermines international security.
In this context, Pope Francis insists that, “the ultimate goal of the total elimination of nuclear weapons becomes both a challenge and a moral and humanitarian imperative.”[2] The actions of nuclear-weapon States, however, leave us far from achieving this goal. Through the modernization and expansion of nuclear arsenals, these States are increasing their reliance on nuclear deterrence, rather than meeting their disarmament obligations under Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).  
Mr. President,
While expressing its deep regret regarding the lack of a consensual outcome document at the Tenth NPT Review Conference, the Holy See noted with concern that, even if the draft outcome had been adopted, the lack of meaningful new disarmament commitments in it would have brought us no closer to a world free of nuclear weapons.
Nevertheless, the nuclear disarmament regime does not lack direction. This June, the States Parties of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) adopted a Declaration and Action Plan that ensure that progress can be made on nuclear disarmament, especially in the areas of verification, victims’ assistance, and environmental remediation. The Holy See reiterates its hope that, irrespective of their positions on the TPNW, States with nuclear weapons will contribute to such efforts.
States must also reinvigorate other components of the nuclear disarmament regime. This includes not only achieving the entry-into-force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) but also launching negotiations on treaties on fissile material and on negative security assurances. Without tangible progress toward these ends, the regime stands at risk of eroding.
Mr. President,
Achieving the total elimination of nuclear weapons requires a response that is “collective and concerted, based on mutual trust,” [3] and considers the catastrophic humanitarian and environmental consequences of nuclear use. As long as nuclear weapons exist, we cannot rule out the possibility of their use, which threatens “any possible future for our common home” as well as humankind’s very existence.[4]
On this Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons, let us each examine how we can help create an environment conducive to reaching our shared objective.
 
Thank you, Mr. President.
 ________________________________________
[1] Pope Francis, Message to His Excellency Ambassador Alexander Kmentt, President of the First Meeting of States Parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, 21 June 2022.
[2] Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter Fratelli Tutti, 3 October 2020, 262.
[3] Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter Fratelli Tutti, 3 October 2020, 262.
[4] Cf. Pope Francis, Address at the Peace Memorial, Hiroshima, November 24, 2019.