sabato 16 ottobre 2021

ONU
Holy See Mission: Week in Review

-First Committee General Debate on Disarmament and Threats to Peace
-The Rule of Law at the National and International Levels
-Concerning Global Partnerships and Countries in Special Situations
-Macroeconomic Policy Questions
-Nuclear Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Conventional Weapons
-Security Council Arria Formula Meeting on the Situation In Haiti
***
First Committee General Debate on Disarmament and Threats to Peace
    On October 11, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave a statement during the General Debate of the First Committee of the UN General Assembly. The First Committee is concerned with disarmament, global challenges and threats to peace that affect the international community.
In his remarks, Archbishop Caccia recalled that the very first resolution ever of the General Assembly was to ensure that atomic energy only be used for peaceful purposes by eliminating atomic weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. That gives witness, he said, to the founding resolve of the UN that a "world without nuclear weapons is possible and necessary."
Those hoping for a world without weapons of mass destruction, he said, have recently had several causes for hope: the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; the plans for the upcoming Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; the extension of the "New START Treaty"; the Program of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons; and the International Tracing Instrument.
He urged nuclear-weapons-possessing States to adopt a "no-first-use policy" as a means to break down a climate of fear and mistrust.
The text of the intervention follows.
To read the text of his intervention, please click here.
***
The Rule of Law at the National and International Levels
    On October 12, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave a statement during the debate of the Sixth Committee of the UN General Assembly on Agenda Item 85, dedicated to “The Rule of Law at the National and International Levels.” The debate was held virtually.
In his remarks, Archbishop Caccia encouraged the Sixth Committee to remind the international community about the centrality of fidelity to treaties, which foster mutual trust and cultivate peace and development. He said that obligations are exclusively set forth in the text of the treaties, as modified by each State's reservations, and the any proposals or opinions beyond the Treaties themselves are not binding unless explicitly approved by States. He welcomed into force the Doha Amendment to the Kyoto Protocol and the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.
He said that more attention needs to be given to the rule of law at the National level, to prevent crime, buttress counter-terrorirsm, broaden access to justice, safeguard the rights of the accused and guarantee humane prison conditions. He expressed concern that the Report of the Secretary-General on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels diverged into controversial issues with regard to the consideration of human rights and fundamental freedoms, which belong to the Third Committee, not the Sixth.
To read the text of his intervention, please click here.
***
Concerning Global Partnerships and Countries in Special Situations
    On October 13, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave a statement during the debates of Second Committee of the UN General Assembly on Agenda Items 23 and 27, dedicated respectively to “Groups of Countries in Special Situations” and “Towards Global Partnerships.” The debates were held virtually.
In his remarks, Archbishop Caccia spoke of strengthening global partnership to ensure that Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and progress on the path of development.
With regard to Least Developed Countries, he said that while progress has been made with regard to healthcare, education, energy and information and communications technology, they still struggle with poverty, low economic growth, and lack of job opportunities. He highlighted three urgent priorities: to invest in human capital, through education and food security; to help LDCs participate more fruitfully in global trade; and to help them increase their climate resilience through climate adaptation and mitigation.
Concerning Landlocked Developing Countries, he noted that the proportion of those living in poverty, suffering from food insecurity, and going without education have worsened due to the pandemic. Mobility restrictions have affected the flow of essential goods and medicines. The international community, he said, must assist LLDCs in international trade and to develop affordable, reliable and resilient emergency, transportation and communications infrastructure.
About Small Island Developing States, he said that improving data collection and analysis is essential, but more important is listening to their people, as they appeal for help in protecting their environment and ecosystems from the effects of climate change, which threatens their survival. He advocated the development of a Multi-dimensional Vulnerability Index.
To read his intervention, please click here.
***
Macroeconomic Policy Questions
    On October 13, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave a statement during the debate of Second Committee of the UN General Assembly on Agenda Item 18, dedicated to the “Macroeconomic Policy Questions.” The debate was held virtually.
In his remarks, Archbishop Caccia said that progress on macroeconomic policy cannot be measured solely in monetary gains, but must involve authentic, sustainable and integral human development. Consequently, the Second Committee should consider carefully the ethical implications of development, so that all might benefit from economic prosperity, peace and stability. The pandemic has revealed, he said, that weak healthcare systems and poor health financing can endanger not just economies but human lives and that developing countries are hardest hit because they do not have the same resources to respond. For progress in development, investment must be made in human capital. The growing debt and poverty of Least Developed Countries, exacerbated by the pandemic, must also be addressed, he said, so that the pandemic isn't followed by a financial crisis. He also called on the international community to redouble its efforts in the fight against corruption, which hinder macroeconomic growth and makes it harder for the poor to access the economy.
To read his intervention, please click here.
***
Nuclear Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Conventional Weapons
    On October 14, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave a statement during the Debate of the First Committee of the UN General Assembly dedicated to "Nuclear Weapons, Other Weapons of Mass Destruction, Conventional Weapons and Disarmament Aspects of Outer Space."
Archbishop Caccia framed his remarks on Pope Francis' appeal in his encyclical Fratelli Tutti never to abstract from the people "who have suffered the effects of atomic radiation or chemical attacks." He pointed to the continued relevant of international instruments and conventions against biological, chemical and radiological weapons. He likewise addressed the recent extension of the New START Treaty, the upcoming 50th anniversary Review Conference for the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and the Convention on Conventional Weapons.
With regard to nuclear weapons, he reiterated Pope Francis' assessment about the immorality not just of using but of possessing nuclear weapons, "since the intrinsic intentionality of having nuclear weapons is the threat to use them."
And with regard to conventional weapons, he noted that not only must the international community reduce the reliance on conventional weapons to resolve disputes as a means to make more feasible nuclear disarmament but simply out of concern for those harmed.
"We cannot allow ourselves to be spectators to violence and war, to brothers killing brothers, as if we were watching games from a safe distance," he said. "The lives of peoples are not playthings. We cannot be indifferent onlookers."
To read his intervention, please click here.
***
Security Council Arria Formula Meeting on the Situation In Haiti
    On October 15, Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, spoke at the Security Council Arria Formula Meeting on Haiti, which was convened virtually.
He referenced the earthquakes and natural disasters the Haitian people have suffered as well as the widespread civil unrest, kidnappings, gang violence and the assassination of President Moïse, saying that lack of security has become unbearable. He called on the international community to fulfill its duty to protect and provide humanitarian assistance and urged the formulation of a long-term vision engaging all Haitians. He expressed the lasting commitment of the Holy See and Catholic institutions in health care, social support and especially education and said that the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti should be equipped with the resources necessary to fulfill its mission.
To read his intervention, please click here